Issues with Tipped Employess and Minimum Wages

boznos law office naperville il

Issues with Tipped Employees and Minimum Wages

 

Tipped employees often receive a smaller “base” salary, and the remainder of their pay is made up in tips. This is most common in the restaurant business. However, unless the tip program is properly operated, a business could face huge potential liability.

Tipped employees are those who customarily and regularly receive more than $30 a month in tips. Tips actually received by tipped employees may be counted as wages for purposes of the FLSA, but the employer must pay not less than $2.13 an hour in direct wages.

Requirements

If an employer elects to use the tip credit provision the employer must:

1) Inform each tipped employee about the tip credit allowance (including amount to be credited) before the credit is utilized; AND

2) Be able to show that the employee receives at least the minimum wage when direct wages and the tip credit allowance are combined; AND

3) Allow the tipped employee to retain all tips, whether or not the employer elects to take a tip credit for tips received, except to the extent the employee participates in a valid tip pooling arrangement.

If an employee’s tips combined with the employer’s direct wages of at least $2.13 an hour do not equal the State of Illinois minimum wage, currently set at $8.25 ; the employer must make up the difference.

Dual Jobs

When an employee is employed concurrently in both a tipped and a non-tipped occupation, the tip credit is available only for the hours spent in the tipped occupation. The FLSA permits an employer to take the tip credit for time spent in duties related to the tipped occupation, even though such duties are not by themselves directed toward producing tips, provided such duties are incidental to the regular duties and are generally assigned to such occupations. Where tipped employees are routinely assigned to maintenance, or where tipped employees spend a substantial amount of time (in excess of 20 percent) performing general preparation work or maintenance, no tip credit may be taken for the time spent in such duties.

Retention of Tips

The law forbids any arrangement between the employer and the tipped employee whereby any part of the tip received becomes the property of the employer. A tip is the sole property of the tipped employee. Where an employer does not strictly observe the tip credit provisions of the Act, no tip credit may be claimed and the employees are entitled to receive the full cash minimum wage, in addition to retaining tips they may\should have received.

Service Charges

A compulsory charge for service, for example, 15 percent of the bill, is not a tip. Such charges are part of the employer’s gross receipts. Where service charges are imposed and the employee receives no tips, the employer must pay the entire minimum wage and overtime required by the Act.

Tip Pooling

The requirement that an employee must retain all tips does not preclude a valid tip pooling or sharing arrangement among employees who customarily and regularly receive tips, such as waiters, waitresses, bellhops, counter personnel (who serve customers), busboys/girls and service bartenders. Tipped employees may not be required to share their tips with employees who have not customarily and regularly participated in tip pooling arrangements, such as dishwashers, cooks, chefs, and janitors. Only those tips that are in excess of tips used for the tip credit may be taken for a pool. Tipped employees cannot be required to contribute a greater percentage of their tips than is customary and reasonable.

Credit Cards

Where tips are charged on a credit card and the employer must pay the credit card company a percentage on each sale, then the employer may pay the employee the tip, less that percentage. This charge on the tip may not reduce the employee’s wage below the required minimum wage. The amount due the employee must be paid no later than the regular pay day and may not be held while the employer is awaiting reimbursement from the credit card company.

With over 30 years’ experience in advising employers and employees on workplace issues, and those effecting personal lives such as domestic violence, let Boznos Law work with you to ensure you are ready to meet the challenges posed by the practice of tipping as it relates to minimum wages. Call Bill Boznos today at (630) 375-1958 or contact us at www.boznoslawoffice.com/contact-us through our website at www.boznoslawoffice.com

Share:

More Posts

Hello world!

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start writing!

Send Us A Message